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Latest News

Market Timing and Your Investment June 5, 2020

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Spending Triggers May 5, 2020

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Pullbacks, Corrections, and Bear Markets May 5, 2020

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April is National Credit Union Youth Month! April 24, 2020

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Financial Self Care April 16, 2020

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How Will COVID-19 Impact Market Outlook? April 8, 2020

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What You Should Know About the Stimulus Checks April 2, 2020

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Small Business Relief March 30, 2020

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A Letter From Jennifer March 30, 2020

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Coronavirus March 16, 2020

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Featured

Market Timing and Your Investment

Close-up of a businessman's hand analyzing graph on laptop at workplace

June 1, 2020

Hindsight is 20/20. It’s only human to imagine what it might have been like to turn left instead of right on some fateful day. However, that sort of daydreaming is unhelpful when investing, especially when it leads you to try and time the market.

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, we’ve seen a great deal of volatility. But, in the two months since March 23rd’s record low, the S&P 500 has risen 33%.1,2 While past performance doesn’t guarantee future results, it shows how quickly market sentiment can change.

I prefer a disciplined approach to investing. I combine a person’s goals, time horizon, and tolerance for risk with my own understanding of the overall economic landscape. It boils down to this: in timing the market to avoid the “bad” day, you risk missing the “good” days, too.

Missing even just a few of those “good days” can really add up.

A national investment firm looked at a $10,000 investment into the S&P 500 for 38 years. By missing only the five best days over that period, the investment grew to $458,476. Meanwhile, if the money remained in the account untouched, it would have grown to $708,143. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns, but this illustration shows the long-term power of “time in the market vs. timing the market.”3

As your financial professional, I understand that volatility can cause anxiety, and it can be tough to sit still when it’s happening. But as we’ve seen lately, it may sometimes be best to tune out the noise and trust the strategy that’s already established. I always look forward to answering your questions, so if you have any, please reach out and let’s set up a time to talk.

Sincerely,

Steve Lindquist

Steve Lindquist

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Lindquist 
stevelindquist@peakfns.com 
Financial Consultant
295 Los Altos Parkway, Suite 105
Sparks, NV 89436
(775) 789-3140

www.gbfinancial.org/

Steve Lindquist is a registered representative offering securities and advisory services through Cetera Advisor Networks LLC, member FINRA/SIPC a Broker/Dealer and Registered Investment Advisor.  Cetera is under separate ownership from any other named entity. Registered address: 295 Los Altos Parkway, Suite 105., Sparks NV 89436.

Investments are not deposits; not FDIC/NCUSIF insured; and not insured by any federal government agency.  No credit union guarantee.  May lose value.

1. Putnam.com, May 21, 2020

2. Reuters.com, May 21, 2020 – The S&P 500 Composite index is an unmanaged index that is generally considered representative of the U.S. stock market. Index performance is not indicative of the past performance of a particular investment. Keep in mind that the return and principal value of stock prices will fluctuate as market conditions change. And shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost.

3. The Simple Dollar, May 21, 2020

Spending Triggers

Hello Everyone!

COVID and quarantining at home has definitely brought some challenges.   Specifically, I am hearing from clients about the dreaded COVID – 15!!! 

Oh no, what’s that – a new virus?  Not exactly – it’s the

*15 pounds gained during quarantine!, OR the

* 15 hours a day binging TV shows, OR the

* 15 times a parent loses their minds while helping “Johnny” with “common core” math, OR the 

* 15 daily/weekly (online) shopping trips –  OH, the lure of a few clicks and direct delivery!

 

What are we supposed to do?

Well, habits – both good and bad (unfortunately) – are created largely because we are “triggered”. 

What is a trigger? A trigger is a thought, feeling or reaction (happy, sad, lonely, guilty, upset, anxious) that prompts a behavior.

Let me bring this around to money.   Specifically, a spending trigger is the thought, feeling or reaction that prompts spending money!   For example:

  • I need it – I feel / look good in this item so I need it
  • I can afford it – I just got a raise so now I can afford this – both one time & reoccurring purchases
  • It makes me feel better – I had a tough day, so I bought this item to make me feel better
  • It’s on SALE – I got an email from my favorite shopping site, it was on SALE
  • I deserve it – I bought this new car because I just got a promotion / graduation and I deserve it

Triggers are usually non-planned, non-focused and reoccurring which makes our behavior repeatable!  Now, I don’t want to get too deep in the weeds here so if you need help in this area, call me and let’s talk.  But in the meantime, here are some simple ways to address your spending triggers.

 

Addressing Spending Triggers

  • Reduce your access to spending – if emails announcing sales are a trigger – delete one email a day/week/month
  • Stop and consider why you want the item – do you need it?
  • Give yourself a 24 hour calming period before hitting “buy”
  • Identify the underlying reasons for spending – are you buying to feel better / release stress?

 

Remember

  • Spending will never heal your feelings
  • Shopping in distress affects your budget, which affects your mood, which can cause more spending – it’s a cycle!
  • If you want to save money consider a savings account – instead of a store receipt
  • There are good habits that you can create to replace the shopping “high”

 

If you want help with financial spending triggers or anything else with your finances, please give me a call.  I’m happy to help!

Michelle

Great Basin Financial Services

Pullbacks, Corrections, and Bear Markets

Hello –

The COVID-19 outbreak has put tremendous pressure on stock prices, prompting some investors to blindly and indiscriminately sell positions at a time when the entire market is trending lower. Worried investors believe “this time it’s different.” When the market drops, some investors lose perspective that downtrends, and uptrends, are part of the investing cycle. When stock prices break lower, it’s a good time to review common terms that are used to describe the market’s downward momentum.1,2

Pullbacks.

A pullback represents the mildest form of a selloff in the markets. You might hear an investor or trader refer to a dip of 5-10% after a peak as a “pullback.”1

Corrections.

The next degree in severity is a “correction.” If a market or markets retreats 10% to 20% after a peak, you’re in correction territory. At this point, you’re likely on guard for the next tier.1

Bear Market.

In a bear market, the decline is 20% or more since the last peak.1

All of this is normal.

Pullbacks, corrections, and bear markets are a part of the investing cycle. When stock prices are trending lower, some investors can second-guess their risk tolerance. But periods of market volatility can be the worst times to consider portfolio decisions.

Pullbacks and corrections are relatively common and represent something that any investor may see from time to time in their financial life, often several times over the course of a decade. Bear markets are much rarer. What we are experiencing now represents the start of the ninth bear market since 1926. This bear market follows the longest bull market on record.1

How is this bear market going to affect me?

That’s a good question, but it’s something that you won’t fully understand in the here and now. The average bear market lasts 146 days for the Standard & Poor’s 500.2

A retirement strategy formed with a financial professional has market volatility factored in. As you continue your relationship with that professional, they will also be at your side to make any adjustments and help you make any necessary decisions along the way. Their goal is to help you pursue your goals.

Sincerely,

Steve Lindquist 

Steve Lindquist

Steve Lindquist 
stevelindquist@peakfns.com 
Financial Consultant
295 Los Altos Parkway, Suite 105
Sparks, NV 89436
(775) 789-3140

www.gbfinancial.org/

Steve Lindquist is a registered representative offering securities and advisory services through Cetera Advisor Networks LLC, member FINRA/SIPC a Broker/Dealer and Registered Investment Advisor.  Cetera is under separate ownership from any other named entity. Registered address: 295 Los Altos Parkway, Suite 105., Sparks NV 89436. 

Investments are not deposits; not FDIC/NCUSIF insured; and not insured by any federal government agency.  No credit union guarantee.  May lose value.

1. Kiplinger.com, March 10, 2020.

2. MarketWatch.com, March 14, 2020. The Standard & Poor’s 500 is an unmanaged index that is generally considered representative of the U.S. stock market. Index performance is not indicative of the past performance of a particular investment. Past performance does not guarantee future results. Individuals cannot invest directly in an index. The return and principal value of stock prices will fluctuate as market conditions change. And shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG, LLC, is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2020 FMG Suite.

April is National Credit Union Youth Month!

Young girl putting change into piggy bank

It’s never too early for kids to learn how to save. That’s why we offer two savings accounts tailored specifically for kids:

Don’t worry if your child isn’t a member yet, they can still get in on the fun. Click here to see how simple it is to open an account online today.

We want to see what our youngest members are saving for! Encourage your child to draw a picture of what they’re saving for and send it to us at marketing@greatbasin.org. We’ll put the pictures on our Facebook page and the artist whose picture receives the most likes by May 11th will win a $25 Amazon gift card** and $25 deposited into their GBFCU youth account.** Drawings will be accepted until April 30th!

*Upon reaching age 18, this account will be converted to one of our adult account options.
**Child must be a current GBFCU Youth Member to be considered. Contest is not in any way affiliated with Facebook. Credit Union reserves the right end or change the rules of this contest at any time. Drawings will be accepted until 5 p.m. on April 30th, 2020.  Certain restrictions apply. See Credit Union for details. 

Financial Self Care

Cup of coffee sitting on table

Hello everyone! 

The importance of self-care is well known.  Exercise, healthy eating, mindfulness, and yoga increase satisfaction, decrease stress and contribute to overall wellness. 

BUT – did you know that Financial Self-Care is just as valuable?   According to a Pre-COVID-19 poll, 80% of Americans said money was their number one stressor!  Finances affect physical, mental and emotional aspects of our lives. Financial Self Care is REALLY important!

Here are 8 steps you can begin to take right now to practice Financial Self-Care:

  1. Schedule Money Time

Just like you might schedule some needed Me time, your Money needs time too.  Use this time to ask yourself important questions about your money, including, “Where is it coming from?” and ‘Where is it going?”.  Also, think about where you might get help on certain subjects if you need it. 

  1. Find Good Support

Find someone you can work with that will support you as you make important changes and who will help you celebrate your achievements. 

  1. Remember Self Worth is NOT Net Worth

Your importance and value as a person has nothing to do with the amount of money you have in your bank account. 

  1. Create a positive money mood 

Who says you need to be in a dungeon when creating a budget?  Put on some music, light candles – create a pleasant ambiance and make your Money Time more pleasant.

  1. Be forgiving

Let go of your past and embrace the positive future that you are beginning to create right now. You can learn – and ARE learning – every day to make positive steps.

  1. Tell your inner critic to “Shut it!”

That voice in your head….the one that’s always nagging and telling you that you “Can’t”….

Well, Shut It and counter it with positive money messages.  Yes, you can!

  1. Goal! Setting

Goals give you a direction and something to work toward.   Remember keep them SMART.

  1. Keep the Hope on

You can do this and things will get better.  

Remember to be patient with yourself as you implement financial changes.  As you continue to practice Financial Self Care you will see positive changes in your thinking, behaviors and in your life. 

Great Basin Financial Services can help with NO COST coaching.  We are here to help our members and our community toward a better financial future. 

We would love to be part of your support group.  Just give us a call.

Michelle Winders
775-789-3123