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Identity Theft

Identity Theft

What is it? Identify theft can take several forms. Criminals collect your information and then pose as you. They can take over your accounts or set up new accounts in your name. Sometimes they get loans in your name and then default on the loan, so collectors are after you. In extreme cases they can also commit crimes in your name, so you are charged with crimes you did not do. They also can go to jail using your name, so you have a record. When your identity is stolen it can be very stressful and take a lot of time and money to clean up the mess.

HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF

Although it is impossible to prevent identity theft, there are several precautions you can take to make it less likely to happen to you. Here are a few of these suggestions:

  1. Make sure to shred all documents with personal information before throwing away.
  2. Put outgoing mail in a secure mail box or take to the post office yourself.
  3. If you are not receiving your monthly statements from creditors, the criminals maybe stealing them for information.
  4. Review monthly statements for erroneous charges and report them immediately.
  5. Only give out personal information when necessary to businesses you know. Do not respond to email or letters asking to verify information.
  6. Keep a list of credit cards in a safe place with phone numbers to call if lost/stolen.
  7. Make sure to get your free credit report from each of the credit reporting agencies each year. Since there are three companies, you can get one report every four months (ex. Experian in January, Transunion in May, and Equifax in September). Just go to: https://www.annualcreditreport.com/cra/index.
  8. Use a unique password for each of your accounts. If a fraudster hacks one place, they could have access to every other place that you use that same password.
  9. Never disclose credit card, bank or personal information to someone you do not know or are unsure of.

HOW WE PROTECT YOU

  • Great Basin takes great care with all of your personal information; we keep it secure and we’ll never share it with third parties.
  • We hold free shred days every few months so you can bring your boxes and bags of documents to destroy safely. There are always shred bins available for you to use in each branch.
  • We encourage the use of your secure eMailBox through Online Banking so that if we need to communicate via email, your information will stay safe.
  • We offer eStatements free of charge so that your statement won’t be floating around in the mail where anyone can take it.
  • You can request that a code word be added to your accounts for when you call or visit a branch.
  • Great Basin FCU will never email you to verify personal information such as your social security number, credit/debit card number, birth dates, mother’s maiden name, etc.

Visit the Federal Trade Commission, U.S. Federal Government’s On Guard Online or Consumer Affairs for more info and to get tips on how to securey our computer and identity against fraud.

Get comparisons and reviews of several ID protection services here.

IF YOU BELIEVE YOU ARE A VICTIM

  1. Place a fraud alert on your credit report
  2. Close all accounts/credit cards that were compromised
  3. File a police report with your local agency
  4. File a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission

If you have any questions regarding identity theft or general security pertaining to your Great Basin Federal Credit Union Account, please contact us at fraud@greatbasin.org.

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